Volunteering with Tails of the Trail

By: Amelia Gibson, PhD, MBA, Kerafast Director of Business Development More than three million dogs are estimated to enter animal shelters in the United States annually. The stress dogs experience living in the shelter environment can lead to physical and emotional issues that threaten their health as well as make them less likely to be 

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New gel regenerates heart muscle after a heart attack

For reasons that are not fully understood, mammalian cardiac muscle cells do not regenerate after suffering an injury. After a heart attack, for example, many of these cells, called cardiomyocytes, are lost and the body is unable to replace them. With fewer cardiomyocytes, the body cannot pump blood as efficiently, which leads to the increased 

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Zombie ants and biological clocks

Nature does some pretty cool things and some very cruel things. Scientists have been fascinated by zombie ants for some time. These ants depart from their nest and normal duties to bite a piece of vegetation, after which they soon die. New research at the University of Central Florida sheds light on the mechanism by 

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Silence is Golden – The Power of siRNAs

What is siRNA? Short interfering RNAs, sometimes referred to as silencing RNAs or siRNA for short, are a common tool to induce transitory suppression of coding genes. In 1928, the Plant Pathology head at Virginia Tech, SA Wingard, noticed that as tobacco plants infected with ringspot virus continued to grow, their outer leaves showed signs 

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A Universal Flu Shot

Heading to the doctor’s office to get a flu shot may become a remnant of the past. Unlike vaccines for other viruses, the flu vaccine requires annual renewal to be effective. Researchers are aiming to change this paradigm by designing a universal vaccine that would be effective against most flu strains. Caused by the influenza 

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Researchers develop new microglial cell line

Microglia cells play an essential role in the central nervous system. Accounting for 10-15% of all cells in the brain, these phagocytic cells are involved in neural development, protection from immunological threats, and inflammatory processes. In a new study, published in the December issue of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, an international team of researchers describe 

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Brain shown to transmit sound early in development

Can exposing unborn babies to classical music make them smarter later in life? It’s a common enough belief that it has a name – the Mozart effect – and some research has in fact supported a link between prenatal sound exposure and improved brain function. However, scientists have not been able to pinpoint any brain 

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New insights into blood clot regulation

Researchers have identified a two-step mechanism responsible for activating a protein that triggers blood clotting in humans. The protein, called the von Willebrand factor, walks a fine line: clotting too much can lead to life-threatening blood clots, while clotting too little can cause uncontrollable bleeding. The research team captured video of the von Willebrand factor 

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Celebrating Jonas Salk on World Polio Day

Jonas Salk, best known as the creator of the polio vaccine, was born 103 years ago this October 24. In honor of the anniversary of his birth – now celebrated globally as World Polio Day – we’re highlighting his life’s many achievements, from his early work protecting US soldiers from influenza during World Word II, 

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HUBweek: Highlighting our innovative neighborhood

Last week was HUBweek in Boston, a week of activities that feature innovation in art, science and technology. Over the course of the week, participants visited a variety of venues around the cities of Boston and Cambridge, including pop-up domes on Boston’s City Hall Plaza. Boston has long been recognized as a leader in innovation 

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