Gut bacteria are important regulators of autoimmunity

Humans possess a number of mechanisms that provide protection against a multitude of pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and parasites. Unfortunately, there are instances when the immune system that monitors and disposes of pathogens can react to an individual’s own cells. This aberrant response is known as autoimmunity and can lead to the development of 

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Adaptation to pesticides in frogs is complex

Researchers from several institutions recently collaborated to study the evolution of pesticide tolerance in amphibians. Their research, published in Evolutionary Applications, continues the work of Dr. Jessica Hua and others who demonstrated that there are two different mechanisms by which pesticide tolerance may evolve. Constitutive vs. inducing tolerance The use of pesticides in agriculture can 

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New neurons discovered in the amygdala

Scientists from the University of Queensland in Australia have demonstrated that adult brains produce new cells within the amygdala, an almond-shaped region of the brain involved in emotional processing. The research may have applications for treating disorders such as depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The paper was published this August in Molecular Psychiatry 

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5 Ways to Improve Your Western Blot

Western blot is a common lab technique used to detect specific proteins in a cell or tissue lysate via antibodies. A misunderstood nemesis, Western blots are a source of headaches and anxieties around the lab. Unlike other protocols, there is no one size fits all approach to blotting – what works for one protein can 

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Microbial ‘vampires’ killed by light

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered a way to destroy Staphylococcus aureus (staph) using light in combination with an enzyme-activating small molecule. The research was published this summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. Though about 30% of healthy people carry the 

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New telomere findings with implications for human aging and cancer

An international team of researchers recently discovered a mechanism that regulates the identification and repair of critically short telomeres, the structures that protect chromosome ends from degradation. The new research, published in Cell, cites our DNA-RNA Hybrid [S9.6] Antibody and has implications for both human aging and cancer. The role of telomeres Telomeres are found 

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The CETSA Technique for Drug Discovery

Traditionally, drug discovery groups have monitored target engagement in cells by looking at impacts in downstream signaling following treatment with a compound against a particular target. However, because proteins often participate in multiple signaling pathways, and compounds can bind to proteins aside from the target (called off-targets), looking only at downstream signaling can be convoluted 

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What’s a Patient-Derived Xenograft?

Here at Kerafast, we recently added the first patient-derived xenograft model to our online platform. Developed at Virginia Commonwealth University, this xenograft was derived from a 74-year-old female patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and fully characterized in an Oncotarget journal article. The xenograft’s addition to our catalog prompted us to ask the question: 

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